HB Blog

Insights from the leadership at HB on technology and culture

The Rise of the As-A-Service Economy

on January 31, 2017

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The as-a-service (aaS) economy is new and exciting for several reasons. Data as a Service (DaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), Videoconferencing as a Service (VCaaS)—cloud technology has made these solutions possible, and it’s only the beginning. The as-a-service  approach affords modern companies flexibility, better resource management, and more agility in a constantly-changing business world.

Companies are realizing the value of cloud-based service offerings, and there are some great benefits to working with managed services providers (MSPs) for a variety of technology-related needs. Let’s explore those benefits: 

Save Money with Cost-effective aaS

When you allocate a specific operation to an MSP, you’re essentially eliminating the need for onsite hardware and internal investments. Think of it as outsourcing a specific concern to a dedicated department. MSPs build their businesses on thorough management and service, so you can expect top-notch care when you work with one. If an MSP falls short of your expectations or needs, you can shop for another. It is less costly to switch providers than to invest in an internal structure for handling the issue.

Investing in MSP as trusted vendor partners affords you the ability to concentrate your internal growth in key areas, rather than spreading development resources across the entire organization. MSPs need to perform well to survive, so they naturally have incentive to do their very best work. Most MSPs will make it clear up front what the benefits are to hiring them, and will make certain to completely manage the concerns of whatever you delegate to them. Essentially, MSPs work on things you don’t want to do. 

Give Your Company What It Needs; aaS is Scalable 

Scalability is an important concept in modern business because companies need services that adapt to changing needs and fluctuating structures. When you invest in MSPs, you can pick and choose exactly which services your company needs and select from the very best providers. This approach offers your organization far more flexibility than creating internal departments for managing these areas, and you can add or subtract services as necessary.

The needs of a business can change rapidly, and MSPs are built around customer satisfaction. When you hire an MSP to handle a specific area of your business, you can usually control the level of service you receive, which offers another layer of scalability. For example, a VCaaS MSP may provide your organization with a more-robust videoconferencing system without the additional strain on your own IT department. If you expand internationally, the MSP might be able to cover that as well as domestic communications. You may also need to add mobile videoconferencing. A good MSP will allow you to custom-tailor the level of service you receive so you get exactly what you need for your company.

Limit Uncertainty with MSPs

Modern companies are more technology-dependent than ever before, so investing in MSPs for audio/visual as a service (AVaaS) can help eliminate some of the concerns that accompany the technology upon which your business relies. AV is a specialized field, so investing in a dedicated AVaaS will offer your organization the peace of mind that comes with knowing that professionals are handling your AV issues.

When a business delegates an entire operational process to an MSP, it makes things better for your internal teams. It’s easier to keep everyone on the same page, and the technology they use as simple as possible with MSPs. The flexibility and scalability that working with a managed service provider provides is very attractive. It allows business leaders and their teams to focus on what it is they do best—growing their businesses and serving their customers. What about you and your business? Do you find yourself working with more and more MSPs as vendor partners rather than attempting to do it all in-house? What have the benefits been to that and what challenges, if any, have you faced? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. 

Photo Credit: MjZ Photography Flickr via Compfight cc