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Marrying Polycom and Microsoft Lync To Create Unified Communications Environments

on May 26, 2014

In today's fast paced business world, you need to stay connected at all times, in a variety of ways. That's why Unified Communications has become so important. It allows you to merge different communication platforms into a single source for easy access.

And nowhere is Unified Communications more important than in the field of video conferencing. In order to get a versatile video conferencing experience, it's necessary to merge different platforms. That's why marrying Polycom and Microsoft Lync is such an important step for businesses.

In today's fast paced business world, you need to stay connected at all times, in a variety of ways. That's why Unified Communications has become so important. It allows you to merge different communication platforms into a single source for easy access.

And nowhere is Unified Communications more important than in the field of video conferencing. In order to get a versatile video conferencing experience, it's necessary to merge different platforms. That's why marrying Polycom and Microsoft Lync is such an important step for businesses.

Video Conferencing Versatility

On the surface, video conferencing seems like a fairly straightforward application. With a computer and a camera on each end, and a program to facilitate video calls, you can look someone in the eye from across the country or across the world. You can hold meetings with clients or business partners and talk as if you were in the same room.

But as technology progresses, there's much more that companies need their video conferencing applications to do. First of all, you can't rely on all involved parties using the same software, or everyone else downloading a specific program just to accommodate you. You need an application that will function across multiple platforms -- which is, of course, the very essence of Unified Communications.

In addition, when you think of video conferencing, you think of meetings planned days in advance. Everyone clears their schedule for an hour or two, and one party calls the other at the appointed time. But there's more to it than that. Often, two people in remote locations will simply need to chat for a few minutes to hash out some details. Or they'll be communicating via e-mail or IM and decide they need to show each other some things visually. It's those real world, "on the fly" situations, that make Unified Communications such an integral part of business. Which brings us to marrying Polycom and Microsoft Lync.

Marrying Polycom and Microsoft Lync

Polycom provides some of the world's leading video conferencing solutions for businesses. Going far beyond simple webcams, they offer fully immersive HD video and sound experiences. They also include options for sharing important files and integrating them seamlessly into your video presentation.

Microsoft Lync is an instant messaging platform that allows real time chatting with a variety of contacts at the touch of a button. It's a simple and straightforward tool that facilitates communication in a variety of different ways.

The two seem like very different platforms, but in fact, they're so integral to each other's success that Polycom is specifically designed to integrate with Microsoft Lync. What benefits does that provide you? Well, it lets you put your state of the art video conferencing tools in a familiar setting that's easy to use. Not only that, by integrating chat and video conferencing, you can switch back and forth between the two as needed. Your list of contacts tells you who's available right now and who's not, so that you can collaborate in real time, rather than waiting and scheduling a meeting.

Polycom and Microsoft Lync have complementary functionalities that go hand in hand. It expands your world and allows you to work the way you want, with the people you want, wherever you are. Isn't it time you explored your Unified Communications options for video conferencing?