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Does Cognitive Computing Have a Role in The Future of Unified Communications?

on November 03, 2014

Businesses investing in unified communications are looking forward to harnessing more benefits from it than just being able to communicate from a single platform. They are increasingly warming up to the idea of delivering vital information to employees to get the job done more efficiently. While this has brought UCC vendors face-to-face with the challenge of meeting the new demands, there are two latest technologies that could help them make products and services better aligned to the needs of the their clients.

Businesses investing in unified communications are looking forward to harnessing more benefits from it than just being able to communicate from a single platform. They are increasingly warming up to the idea of delivering vital information to employees to get the job done more efficiently. While this has brought UCC vendors face-to-face with the challenge of meeting the new demands, there are two latest technologies that could help them make products and services better aligned to the needs of the their clients.

A recent article on TechTarget.com discusses the role of digital assistants and cognitive computing in taking UCC to the next level.

Digital assistants   

Have you ever been led to your nearest Chinese takeaway by Siri or perhaps by Cortana? If yes, you have already met these personal assistants that recognize your voice and tackle your queries with the most relevant answers. Apple’s Siri, Microsoft’s Cortana and Google Now are currently the most popular digital assistants that bring together voice recognition, response and search to make the consumption of information a seamless affair. 

Users, however, have found that artificial intelligence of these digital assistants is not to be trusted on all occasions since the areas where they fall short are pretty important ones:  accuracy and context. Several tests conducted on these applications show their inability to answer a variety of query types which go beyond the simple questions like “what is today’s temperature?” And, even when they succeed, some of their answers are not 100% accurate.  

Cognitive computing

Tom Nolle, President of consulting firm, CIMI Corp. discussed in the article how cognitive computing may surpass the drawbacks of the digital assistants. Basically, cognitive computing is replicating the human thought process in a computerized model, which combines artificial intelligence with smart analytics. IBM’s Watson is an example of a cognitive computing platform as a cloud service that “relies on hypothesis generation and evaluation to rapidly parse relevant evidence and evaluate responses from disparate data,” according to IBM. 

Enterprises may have their solution when Siri meets Watson 

Nolle points out that coming together of Siri and Watson could produce more relevant results. With the ability to analyze queries, their context and available information, the Siri-Watson combination may be the best way to go beyond “human exchanges” to a more full-blown collaborative set-up.  To us, that sounds pretty exciting. What about you?

Do you think cognitive computing will change the face of UCC?